Home
Outer wall of the amphitheatre down the hill from the Parthenon.

Outer wall of the amphitheatre down the hill from the Parthenon.

Even in March the Acropolis is a zoo of people.  We made it up the hill at about ten in the morning and there were already hundreds of people.  So there is one thing that is not quieter in Greece in the March low season.  Pretty much all of Athens was busy with tourists.  I can’t even imagine what a crazy place it would be in the summer.

A fraction of the people at the Acropolis, this is just the entrance.

A fraction of the people at the Acropolis, this is just the entrance.

It was sunny and hot today and, as a note to all future travellers to Greece in March, it is still possible to get a horrible sunburn!  I haven’t seen anyone else with burns and most people were not wearing hats or anything, but maybe I’m just a little susceptible.  But on a positive note, the bathrooms were all spotless.  I don’t think I’ve seen many public bathrooms, especially ones that see hundreds to thousands of people a day, be so consistantly clean.

View from the Acropolis, looking toward the parliment buildings and the National Gardens.

View from the Acropolis, looking toward the parliament buildings and the National Gardens.

The Acropolis was all very impressive.  It is really amazing how they manged to hand carve and build all those massive structures.  A lot of the ruins are still just ruins, but they are making progress with patching and restoring many of the structures.  All of the statues, metopes and friezes were removed and either left blank or replaced with casts.  The originals are in the new Acropolis museum.  So you can’t have a visit to one without the other, or else you are not really getting the full picture.  There are no pictures allowed in the museum however, so I have none, and you have to rely on the postcards that they have.

Turtle pond!

Turtle pond!

We had planned to go down and visit the Temple of Zeus, which is one of the sites included in the price of the Acropolis ticket, but it was closed when we got there, so we detoured to the National Gardens which are behind and next to the parliament buildings.  They were really lovely, although we were told that it was nothing compared to later on when all the trees and flowers are blooming.  There was also an unexpected little zoo, but it really only had birds and a few goats.  And then we came around a corner to see a turtle pond!  I have never seen so many together in one place.  I sat and had a rest there and watched children harass the turtles and poke them with sticks.  The poor little things (the turtles), they must have to put up with a lot.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “The Acropolis and the turtle pond

  1. Pingback: Athens – The secrets everyone misses first time around! | Cruise Bulletin

  2. Pingback: Athens – The secrets everyone misses first time around! | Wetravel2u's Weblog

  3. Pingback: Athens – The secrets everyone misses first time around! | Cruise Guides

  4. Pingback: Athens – The secrets everyone misses first time around!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s